Charting Taiwan’s Low Birth Rate, Aging Population

By Matt Stiles | | Topics: Demographics

I’m in Taiwan this month to study Mandarin. During breaks, I’ll be posting occasionally about the island nation’s demographics, politics and (sticky) weather.

Like other East Asian democracies, such as South Korea and Japan, Taiwan has a rapidly aging population, posing demographic and economic challenges for policy makers.

One reason for the age increase is that Taiwan has among the lowest birth rates in the world. These charts highlight the trend.

Mapping ‘Majority Minority’ Counties

By Matt Stiles | | Topics: Demographics

This week the U.S. Census Bureau released updated national population estimates, including a list of the counties that grew most rapidly from 2010 to last summer. I wrote about these counties in a political context this week for work.

Included in the release was a note that six more counties had flipped to “majority minority,” as the bureau calls them. These are counties in which non-Hispanic whites represent less than half the population.

With those six, the country now has at least 352 counties — about one in 10 of the total — in this category. Here they are on a map:

The Daily Viz

The Daily Viz

These counties exist largely because because of the relative size of the Hispanic and black populations (though Hawaii and Alaska have high Asian population rates), depending on geography. Western counties have higher percentages of Hispanic residents, and counties in the Deep South have higher rates of black residents. Of course there are some exceptions sprinkled throughout the country.

This map shows the rate of “minority” residents by county:

The Daily Viz

The Daily Viz

This map shows the percentage of Hispanic residents by county:

The Daily Viz

The Daily Viz

This map shows the percentage of black residents by county:

The Daily Viz

The Daily Viz

You can download the data here. Tomorrow we’ll examine how these counties voted in the 2012 presidential election.

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Charting Metro Diversity

By Matt Stiles | | Topics: Demographics

Interesting news from my favorite Texas city, according to this story the Houston Chronicle

The Houston region is now the most ethnically diverse large metropolitan area in the country, surpassing New York City.

Two suburbs – Missouri City and Pearland – have become even more diverse than the city of Houston. Other suburbs aren’t far behind.

This chart compares the demographics of cities in the Houston area: 

This chart compares the largest metro areas in the country: 

Read the full report, which compared the number of demographic groups and their relative size, here [PDF].