Four Decades of State Unemployment Rates, in Small Multiples, Part 2

By Matt Stiles | | Topics: Economy & Finance

I posted recently about how the state-by-state unemployment rate has changed during my lifetime. The result was a small multiples grid that put the states in context with one another.

Today I’ve created a new version aimed at identifying more precisely how each state has differed from the national unemployment rate during the last four decades. The lines show the percentage point difference — above (worst) or below (better) — from the national rate.

This view allows us easily to identify the most anomalous states in both directions (West Virginia, for example, had quite an unemployment spike during the 1980s; South Dakota, on the other hand, has never been worse than the national rate).

There’s plenty more to explore in this quick remix:

Four Decades of State Unemployment Rates, in Small Multiples

By Matt Stiles | | Topics: Economy & Finance

There’s good news this week in the monthly jobs report, the latest sign that the economy, however grudgingly, has healed from the financial crisis nine years ago:

The unemployment rate fell to 4.6 percent, the Labor Department said, from 4.9 percent. The last time it was this low was August 2007. That was the month, you may recall, when global money markets first froze up because of losses on United States mortgage-related bonds: early tremors of what would become a recession four months later and a global financial crisis nine months after that.

These things, of course, are cyclical. Here’s how the unemployment rate has changed, by state, during my lifetime:

See a full-screen version for a larger grid.

WSJ Unemployment Tracker

By Matt Stiles | | Topics: Economy & Finance

The Wall Street Journal posted an interactive heat map to visualize the unemployment rate nationally over time. The backstory from the latest numbers: 

Under the government’s definitions, people only count as unemployed when they’re actively looking for work. So when the unemployment rate drops, it could mean that unemployed people found jobs, or it could mean that they gave up looking for work. The employment-population ratio, which measures how many people are actually working, is harder to fool.

Today’s jobs report carries good news on both fronts. The unemployment rate fell, and the employment-population ratio rose. That means the improvement in the labor market is real — people actually found jobs.

Charting Recessions and Recoveries

By Matt Stiles | | Topics: Economy & Finance

Amanda Cox from The New York Times charted the current downturn compared with history: 

Horizontal axis shows months. Vertical axis shows the ratio of that month’s nonfarm payrolls to the nonfarm payrolls at the start of recession. Note: Because employment is a lagging indicator, the dates for these employment trends are not exactly synchronized with National Bureau of Economic Research’s official business cycle dates.

Charting ‘Mass Layoffs’

By Matt Stiles | | Topics: Economy & Finance

The Bureau of Labor Statistics reported this week that employers in December conducted roughly 1,380 “mass layoffs,” incidents in which more than 50 workers lose their jobs. That happened to about 145,000 Americans last month, according to new filings for unemployment benefits. 

That figure seems high, but compare it to February 2009, the height of the recession. Back then more than twice as many mass layoffs occurred, affecting 326,000 employees — including 145,000 in the manufacturing sector alone. 

This quick chart, made with Google Docs, shows how these incidents have slowly declined over the months since (see larger, interactive version): 

This chart shows how such incidents spiked in 2001 and 2009 — years in which the U.S. economy struggled (see larger, interactive version): 

Download data

Gov. Rick Perry and Jobs

By Matt Stiles | | Topics: Uncategorized

On the presidential campaign trail, Gov. Rick Perry is touting the Texas’ relatively low unemployment rate. Here’s how the rate has changed during his decade in office. It wasn’t until 2007 that Texas’ jobs picture looked better than the country as a whole: 

View larger version.

UPDATE: Following a reader’s suggestion, I added Texas’ neighboring states, who also have unemployment rates lower than the nation as a whole: 

View larger version.

UPDATE: William M. Hartnett just posted his own viz to Twitter:

Texas unemployment rate compared to New York and Massachusetts, famously low-tax, low-regulation states: http://t.co/xgawHJT (via @stiles)

View larger version.

Mapping Unemployment Change by U.S. Counties

By Matt Stiles | | Topics: Uncategorized

Nationally, the unemployment rate fell less than one percentage point from April 2010 to April 2011. But not all areas of the country are the same.

This map, made with ArcGIS, shows all 3,100 U.S. counties, with darker green shades representing counties that saw their unemployment rates decrease over the year. Darker reds represent higher unemployment rates during that time.

It appears that Nevada and Michigan had counties that improved the most (of course, they had the most room for improvement). Idaho and Louisiana have seen their respective rates increase in many counties: 

Source: Bureau of Labor Statistics | Download data